John Yates

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John Yates is the former Assistant Commissioner in the Metropolitan Police Service and head of Specialist Operations.[1]

Until July 2011, Yates was a member of the Metropolitan Police Management Board and the Assistant Commissioner in charge of Specialist Operations with responsibility for Counter Terrorism, Security and Protection, nationally as well as in London. He was also Chair of the Association of Chief Police Officers - Terrorism & Allied Matters (ACPO - TAM) Business Area, and as such was responsible for co-ordinating national counter terrorism and security policy.[2]

He resigned from the Metropolitan Police on 18 July 2011.[3] In September 2013 the company Westfield announced that Yates would become its head of security in Australia from November. [4]

Contents

Education

Yates was educated at Marlborough College and King's College London.[5]

Stephen Lawrence Inquiry

Yates worked as Staff Officer to Commissioner Paul Condon during the MacPherson Inquiry into the death of black teenager Stephen Lawrence between 1999 and 2000.[6]

East Dulwich corruption inquiry

As a detective superintendent, Yates headed a 2001 inquiry into police corruption within a crime squad in East Dulwich which led to the imprisonment of six serving detectives.[7]

Special Inquiry Squad

As head of the Special Inquiry Squad, Yates was responsible for a number of high-profiles cases, including the perjury conviction of Jeffrey Archer, the Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? fraud case and the investigation of rape allegations against television presenter John Leslie.[8]

Phone Hacking Investigation

In an email to David Cameron's Chief of Staff, Ed Llewellyn, on 10 September 2010, Yates offered to brief the Prime Minister on his examination of the News of the World phone hacking investigation. Llewellyn responded:

On the other matters that have caught your attention this week, assuming we are thinking of the same thing, I am sure you will understand that we will want to be able to be entirely clear, for your sake and ours, that we have not been in contact with you about this subject.
So I don't think it would really be appropriate for the PM, or anyone else at No 10, to discuss this issue with you, and would be grateful if it were not raised please.[9]

Resignation

Yates resigned from the Metropolitan Police on 18 July 2011.[10]

On the same day the Independent Police Complaints Commission announced it would investigate:

The conduct of Assistant Commissioner John Yates:
- in his review in July 2009 and overall role in relation to the phone hacking investigation; and
- in his alleged involvement in inappropriately securing employment for the daughter of a friend;[11]

Bahrain

In December 2011, Yates was appointed to oversee reform of Bahrain's police force, along with US police officer John Timoney.[12] The opposition Bahrain Freedom Movement criticised the appointment, pointing to the past role of British police officers such as Ian Henderson in repression in the country.[13]

External Resources

Notes

  1. Assistant Commissioner John Yates QPM, Specialist Operations, Metropolitan Police, accessed 11 July 2009.
  2. Assistant Commissioner John Yates QPM, Specialist Operations, Metropolitan Police, accessed 11 July 2009.
  3. Statement from AC John Yates, Metropolitan Police, 18 July 2011.
  4. Oliver Laughland in Sydney, John Yates, who quit Met over hacking scandal, joins shopping giant Westfield, theguardian.com, Thursday 19 September 2013 17.17 AEST
  5. Peter Walker, Profile: John Yates, guardian.co.uk, 9 April 2009.
  6. Profile:John Yates, BBC News, 9 April 2009.
  7. Peter Walker, Profile: John Yates, guardian.co.uk, 9 April 2009.
  8. Peter Walker, Profile: John Yates, guardian.co.uk, 9 April 2009.
  9. Helene Mulholland and Matthew Taylor, Phone hacking: emails show Cameron aide 'stopped' briefing, guardian.co.uk, 19 July 2011.
  10. Statement from AC John Yates, Metropolitan Police, 18 July 2011.
  11. IPCC receives referrals from the Metropolitan Police Authority regarding the actions of current and former senior Met Officers, Independent Police Complaints Commission, 18 July 2011.
  12. Cass Jones, Former Metropolitan police chief John Yates hired by Bahrain to reform force, Guardian, 3 December 2011.
  13. Comment: If history is to be believed; Appointment of two police officers heralds new repression in Bahrain, Bahrain Freedom Movement, 3 December 2011.
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